The Oscar nominated costumes for Sense and Sensibility were designed by Jenny Beavan and John Bright. They worked with one another on several other films, including The Remains of the Day, A Room With a View and The Bostonians. Their creations for Emma Thompson’s screenplay of Jane Austen’s famous novel have gone on to be used and altered for many Regency era films and television shows.

This white and blue checked gown has certainly made the rounds over the years, having been worn at least nine times. It first appeared in 1995 on Emma Thompson as Elinor Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility. It was seen again in 2000 on Honeysuckle Weeks as Alice in the television special Victoria Wood with All the Trimmings in a skit entitled Plots and Proposals.  In 2002 it was seen on an extra in the mini-series Napoléon.  In 2003 it was worn again on an extra in Byron, and in 2004 was utilized in the reality series Regency House Party on Victoria Hopkins.  The gown was worn twice in 2007, first in Mansfield Park on Billie Piper as Fanny Price, and then in Persuasion on Rosamund Stephen as Henrietta Musgrove. In 2011 it was spotted on Nicola Burley as Isabella Linton in Wuthering Heights.  Most recently the costume was seen in 2013 in Austenland on Georgia King as Lady Amelia Heartwright, though some trim has been added to the sleeves and empire waist to give it a slightly different look.

Costume Credit: Anna, Cintia, Shrewsbury Lasses

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

The Outer Limits was a black and white science fiction television series that ran on ABC from 1963-1965. It was heavily influenced by The Twilight Zone, though the series eventually became influential in its own right, going on to shape several elements of the television series Star Trek.

Forrest T.Butler and Sabine Manela are the two costumers credited with working on The Outer Limits series, though it is not known if the above helmet originated with them or this production. The first known appearance of this space helmet was in The Outer Limits episode entitled Soldier, which aired in 1964. It was worn on  Michael Ansara as Qarlo Clobregnny. The helmet must have gone back into the studio’s costume stock, because it appeared again several times in the ABC television show Mork and Mindy, which ran from 1978-1982. It was worn as a part of the space uniform worn by Robin Williams as the character Mork.

Costume Credit: Aengus

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

This black and white sequined gown was designed by costumer Donald Brooks.  Brooks has relatively few film credits to his name, as he tended to design mostly for Broadway shows.  He also designed for clients such as Grace Kelly, Barbra Striesand and Jacqueline Kennedy.  In 1963 he received both a Tony Nomination and an Academy Award nomination for best costume design.

This costume was designed for Julie Andrews portrayal of Gertrude Lawrence in the 1968 film Star!  The gown made another appearance on an extra playing a lounge singer in the 1974 film Funny Lady.

Costume Credit: James

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

Recycling gowns is hardly new. It has been in practice in film and television since their invention, and has been common practice in theatre productions for hundreds of years.  In addition, it is also sometimes seen in paintings. Many artists have been known to reuse clothing that they painted. For example a yellow house coat trimmed in ermine appears in several paintings by Vermeer. Sometimes the artist owned the actual garment they painted (almost certainly in Vermeer’s case), while other times it may have been an example from a woman’s magazine that they copied over and over again.

This beautiful striped Victorian gown is especially interesting, because it is actually based on a gown from works of art by French artist James Tissot. The reproduction gown itself has been seen in at least four films. It was first worn on Rya Kihlstedt as Lizzy Elmsworth in the 1995 production of The Buccaneers.  It was seen again Maite Yerro as Juliet on a movie screen in the 1996 film Evita. In 2000 it was worn by Neve McIntosh as Lucy, Lady Audley in Lady Audley’s Secret, and lastly it was worn on Isobel Pravda as Camille Monet in the 2006 mini-series The Impressionists.

The original gown on which the costume was based was not only painted by James Tissot - it was painted by him numerous times.Tissot was an artist who was mostly known for his paintings of women dressed in their elaborate gowns, and while it is not known if Tissot owned some of the gowns he repeatedly painted or not, the fact that his parents were both in the Fashion Industry might lead one to believe that his owning them would not have been out of the realm of possibility. In Professor Lou Taylor’s book The Study of Dress History, he writes:

Tissot reused favorite garments over periods of two or three years. Thus the notion that his 1870s paintings reflected the most up-to-date fashions may be flawed.

Five paintings in which Tissot painted this black and white gown include: The Captain and the Mate (c.1873), The Return from the Boating Trip (c.1873), Boarding the Yacht (c.1873), Still on Top (c.1874) and  Holiday (c.1876).

To see a full gallery of Tissot’s paintings and the beautiful gowns they showcase, go here.

Costume Credit: Katie S., Kiteflier, Shrewsbury Lasses

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

Over the years Hollywood has glamorized Egyptian clothing, jewelry and headdresses, often painting a beautiful, but fairly inaccurate picture. This Egyptian inspired headdress has appeared in at least two BBC productions. It was first seen in the 2009 documentary Cleopatra: Portrait of a Killer on Camelia Ben Sekour as Cleopatra. It was used again in 2010, where it was worn by Alex Kingston as River Song in the episode of Doctor Who entitled The Pandorica Opens, though the palm frond at the top of the headdress has been removed.

To watch the documentary Cleopatra: Portrait of a Killer, click here.  To learn a bit more about the various styles of Royal Egyptian headdresses, go here and here.

Costume Credit: Katie S.

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

Showtime’s series The Tudors, which depicted much of the reign of Henry VIII, was an enormous undertaking that required a tremendous amount of costumes and jewelry to outfit both main characters and extras. Jewelry was purchased and loaned from several jewelers, including Tipperary Crystal and Sorrelli Jewelry.  

This gold tiara, which is accented with rhinestones and small pearls was first seen on The Tudors. It was first seen on Natalie Dormer as Anne Boleyn in 2007 in promotional images for the show. She was also seen wearing it several times throughout the production. The tiara was used again in the third season of The Tudors in 2009 on Annabelle Wallis as Jane Seymour.  Most recently in 2014 the piece was spotted again in the television show The Musketeers, where it was worn on Alexandra Downing as Queen Anne.

Costume Credit: Cintia, Emilie, Lauren, Queenofmultitasking, Steph

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

Italian Costume designer Piero Tosi’s beautiful costumes are instantly recognizable due to the amount of detail that has gone into them. His film credits include Morte a Venezia (Death in Venice), Ludwig and Il Gattopardo (The Leopard), in addition to designing the costumes for several operas over the years. He was nominated five times for an Academy Award for Best Costume Design, and in 2013 was given an honorary Oscar for personal achievement in costume design. To learn more about Piero Tosi’s work over the years, check out this article.

This beautiful dressing gown was first designed for the 1981 film Lady of the Camellias (La Dame aux Camélias) where it was worn on Isabelle Huppert as Alphonsine Plessis.  In 1993 it was worn again on Mia Fothergill as Giuditta in the 1993 film Sparrow (Storia di una Capinera). It was seen a third time in 1998 in Cousin Bette on Kelly Macdonald as Hortense Hulot.

Costume Credit: Emmanuele

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

This blue Victorian riding habit was designed by Joanna Johnston, who has designed costumes for many well known films, including Forrest Gump, Saving Private Ryan and Lincoln, for which she was nominated for an Oscar for best costume design.

This costume was first created for the 1992 film Far and Away, where it was worn on Nicole Kidman as Shannon Christie.  It was worn again in 1996 in The Treasure Seekers on Camilla Power as Dora Bastable.  Lastly it was seen in 2002 in the mini-series The Forsyte Saga on Gillian Kearney as June Forsyte.

Costume Credit: Isabel, James, Shrewsbury Lasses

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

Recycledmoviecostumes.com is happy to celebrate its fifth year online! I would like to thank each and every reader, follower and contributor for all of your wonderful findings, fascinating information, comments, helpful feedback, kindness, patience and never-ending encouragement. You guys are amazing! Thank you so much!  Recycled Movie Costumes looks forward to many more years of beautiful costumes!
Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

Recycledmoviecostumes.com is happy to celebrate its fifth year online! I would like to thank each and every reader, follower and contributor for all of your wonderful findings, fascinating information, comments, helpful feedback, kindness, patience and never-ending encouragement. You guys are amazing! Thank you so much!  Recycled Movie Costumes looks forward to many more years of beautiful costumes!

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

With the advent of moving pictures came the need for an entire industry of people to help fulfill the demand for new films – lighting, set design, and of course, costumers.  The book Hollywood and History: Costume Design and Film by Edward Maeder has some interesting information about the first ever costume dramas, where some costumes for films originated, and how the first costume houses for film came into existence. He writes:

The Birth of a Nation (1915) and Intolerance (1916), both directed by D.W. Giffith are among the first films that specifically used costumes to create the illusion of an earlier time. Prior to these films, suggesting period dress was not considered. Actors frequently wore clothing from their personal wardrobes regardless of its accuracy for the period or their characters…Costumes played an important part in these pictures, but they were still primarily the responsibility of the director and actors. It was not until the 1920s, with the formation of large studios in Hollywood, that costume design became a specialized task. Studios began to maintain large costume departments with skilled staff that worked exclusively on costume pictures.

This dress is not only one of the earliest documented reuses of film costumes, but it also originated in the silent era.  It was worn both times on the actress Madge Shelton, first in the 1922 silent production of Lorna Doone, where she played the title character.  Ten years later in 1932 she wore it in the film White Zombie (considered the first full length Zombie film) as the character Madeline Short Parker.

Costume Credit:  The Dreamstress , Shrewsbury Lasses

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest