Italian Costume designer Piero Tosi’s beautiful costumes are instantly recognizable due to the amount of detail that has gone into them. His film credits include Morte a Venezia (Death in Venice), Ludwig and Il Gattopardo (The Leopard), in addition to designing the costumes for several operas over the years. He was nominated five times for an Academy Award for Best Costume Design, and in 2013 was given an honorary Oscar for personal achievement in costume design. To learn more about Piero Tosi’s work over the years, check out this article.

This beautiful dressing gown was first designed for the 1981 film Lady of the Camellias (La Dame aux Camélias) where it was worn on Isabelle Huppert as Alphonsine Plessis.  In 1993 it was worn again on Mia Fothergill as Giuditta in the 1993 film Sparrow (Storia di una Capinera). It was seen a third time in 1998 in Cousin Bette on Kelly Macdonald as Hortense Hulot.

Costume Credit: Emmanuele

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

This blue Victorian riding habit was designed by Joanna Johnston, who has designed costumes for many well known films, including Forrest Gump, Saving Private Ryan and Lincoln, for which she was nominated for an Oscar for best costume design.

This costume was first created for the 1992 film Far and Away, where it was worn on Nicole Kidman as Shannon Christie.  It was worn again in 1996 in The Treasure Seekers on Camilla Power as Dora Bastable.  Lastly it was seen in 2002 in the mini-series The Forsyte Saga on Gillian Kearney as June Forsyte.

Costume Credit: Isabel, James, Shrewsbury Lasses

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

Recycledmoviecostumes.com is happy to celebrate its fifth year online! I would like to thank each and every reader, follower and contributor for all of your wonderful findings, fascinating information, comments, helpful feedback, kindness, patience and never-ending encouragement. You guys are amazing! Thank you so much!  Recycled Movie Costumes looks forward to many more years of beautiful costumes!
Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

Recycledmoviecostumes.com is happy to celebrate its fifth year online! I would like to thank each and every reader, follower and contributor for all of your wonderful findings, fascinating information, comments, helpful feedback, kindness, patience and never-ending encouragement. You guys are amazing! Thank you so much!  Recycled Movie Costumes looks forward to many more years of beautiful costumes!

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

With the advent of moving pictures came the need for an entire industry of people to help fulfill the demand for new films – lighting, set design, and of course, costumers.  The book Hollywood and History: Costume Design and Film by Edward Maeder has some interesting information about the first ever costume dramas, where some costumes for films originated, and how the first costume houses for film came into existence. He writes:

The Birth of a Nation (1915) and Intolerance (1916), both directed by D.W. Giffith are among the first films that specifically used costumes to create the illusion of an earlier time. Prior to these films, suggesting period dress was not considered. Actors frequently wore clothing from their personal wardrobes regardless of its accuracy for the period or their characters…Costumes played an important part in these pictures, but they were still primarily the responsibility of the director and actors. It was not until the 1920s, with the formation of large studios in Hollywood, that costume design became a specialized task. Studios began to maintain large costume departments with skilled staff that worked exclusively on costume pictures.

This dress is not only one of the earliest documented reuses of film costumes, but it also originated in the silent era.  It was worn both times on the actress Madge Shelton, first in the 1922 silent production of Lorna Doone, where she played the title character.  Ten years later in 1932 she wore it in the film White Zombie (considered the first full length Zombie film) as the character Madeline Short Parker.

Costume Credit:  The Dreamstress , Shrewsbury Lasses

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

This pretty purple gown was first seen in 1994 on Julia Sawalha as Mercy Pecksniff in Martin Chuzzlewit.  It was used again in the 2001 Victoria and Albert on Victoria Hamilton as Queen Victoria.

Costume Credit: Shrewsbury Lasses

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

Occasionally movie costumes show up in places other than television or film.  Over the past few years a great many costumes that were originally designed for the screen were used in various photo shoots which then went on to grace the covers of historical fiction novels. This beautifully detailed green gown with woven sleeves originated in the 1984 Dutch film Willem van Oranje (William of Orange), where it was worn on Linda van Dyck as Anna of Saxony. It was seen again fourteen years later on an extra in the 1998 film Shakespeare in Love.  It was used on another extra in the 2007 Hot Fuzz, and was finally utilized for the cover of the 2008 Alison Weir novel The Lady Elizabeth.

Costume Credit: Katie S., Shrewsbury Lasses, Sofia

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

This elegant blue Regency era gown was first spotted in the 2007 film Becoming Jane, where it was worn on Anna Maxwell Martin as Cassandra Austen.  It was seen again that very same year on ITV’s Jane Austen Season, where it was worn by Catherine Walker as Eleanor Tilney in Northanger Abbey.

Costume Credit: Alessia

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

The 1970s saw a slew of excellent BBC costume dramas, including the 1974 mini-series The Pallisers, based on several novels by Anthony Trollope.  Raymond Hughes, who worked on projects such as Doctor Who and Return to Oz, helped to design the hundreds of costumes required for The Pallisers, which spanned many years and the ever changing silhouette of the Victorian era.  The costumes for The Pallisers have since gone on to be used in numerous productions over the years, including The Paradise, The Buccaneers and the Onedin Line.

This beautiful embroidered gown, which appeared in The Pallisers on Susan Hampshire as Glencora Palliser, Duchess of Omnium was used again in 2006 in The Prestige, where it was worn on Scarlett Johansson as Olivia. The gown was eventually put on display several years ago as a part of Cosprop’s Cinematic Couture exhibit.  Photos of the exhibit allow one to better see the incredible amount of detail that went into every aspect of the costume.

Costume Credit: James

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

This Elizabethan doublet was first designed for the 1998 film Shakespeare in Love, where it was worn on Gregor Truter as James Hemmings. It was seen again in 2001 on an extra in The Life and Adventures of Nicolas Nickleby, and then again in 2010 on an extra in the episode of Doctor Who entitled Vampires of Venice.

Costume Credit: Anna, Katie S. Shrewsbury Lasses

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest

Hollywood starlet Marilyn Monroe is still a household name more than fifty years after her death. Her films are still loved by millions, and a couple of the many iconic costumes that she wore over the years have sold for seven figure sums. 

The majority of Marilyn’s gowns were designed by William Travilla, and while we associate them with Marilyn and the roles she played, it is easy to forget that her wardrobe was the property of 20th Century Fox, the studio to which she was under contract.  Most of her costumes eventually found a second life on other actresses, either in film or in promotional images for the studio.

This orange gown, accented with sequins and beads appeared on Marilyn in the 1953 film Gentleman Prefer Blondes, where she played the character of Lorelei Lee.  Several years later in 1956, the dress was used again on Abbey Lincoln playing herself in The Girl Can’t Help It, where she performed a number entitled “Spread the Word”, which can be seen here.

Costume Credit: Lelia

E-mail Submissions: submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com

Follow:  Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest